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Force Engagement studies

Documents

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A.27.R - CLOSE AIR SUPPORT (CAS) OPERATIONS IN SUPPORT OF AN EUBG OPERATION.

The EUBG may be called upon to intervene in a wide variety of military operations.
In most cases, the ability to co-ordinate the activities of the Land and Air Components and the use of effective CAS, will be crucial for the success of its mission. CAS is provided by aircrafts and armed helicopters and it can be used by the EUBG in both offensive and defensive operations.
harier
The EUBG in order to be able to provide effective CAS to its troops, it needs to have the necessary C2 structure. Training should include CAS requests (preplanned and immediate), airspace management and FACs terminal guidance.

A.26.R - INTEGRATION OF EFFECTS WITHIN THE DECISION MAKING PROCESS

Recommendations for the integration of effects within the decision-making process and the implications on the structure and organization of HQs
In order to achieve his mission in today's complex environment of operating 'amongst the people', the commander, at the tactical level, must have a thorough understanding of the environment in which he finds himself; he must be capable of using all military and non-military means at his disposal; and he must be capable of making them converge in a complimentary manner towards the desired objective. He therefore needs to have at his disposal specific planning and operating processes as well as the various means which will allow him to plan his different actions, to measure their effects and to re-orientate them in the pursuit of further objectives.

A.24.R - OPERATIONAL CO-OPERATION WITH PRIVATE MILITARY COMPANIES (PMC)

POSSIBILITIES AND LIMITATIONS OF THE OPERATIONAL CO-OPERATION WITH PRIVATE MILITARY COMPANIES (PMC)
pmc Since the late nineties, Private " Military " Companies (PMC) have increasingly become a common and widespread actor in all conflicts. Soldiers of fortune have been replaced by well organised and commercial companies of some standing, offering their services to all sorts of clients, governments included.

The use of PMC by third parties is increasing. PMC are more and more perceived as a convenient solution for high risk tasks. Military forces require an understanding of the methods of operation of such companies, in order that at the tactical, headquarters and individual soldiers have clear instructions as to the manner in which they should deal with PMC employees on the ground.

A.25.R - EUROPEAN UNION BATTLE GROUP MANUAL

Guidance for operational preparation and tactical use eubg

Definition of generic missions which can be entrusted to the EU BG :

  • What to do with an EUBG?

Conceivable employment doctrine(s) for an EU BG at tactical level :

  • How to conduct an EUBG deployment?

A.23.R - BALANCE OF METHODS OF ACTION, WITHIN THE CONTINUUM OF OPERATIONS, WHEN FACING AN INSURGENCY

RECOMMENDATIONS RELEVANT TO FORCE STRUCTURE AND HQ ORGANISATION.
After any external intervention Finabel countries forces will provide a supporting relationship to inter-agency nation building activity. While military stability methods of action will be key to maintaining a permissive environment in which other agencies can work, key to achieving this will be the countering of any emergent insurgency quickly and within the construct of inter-agency effort. After determining the principles to follow in this kind of operation, the study will highlight the key elements Finabel countries forces have to focus in the headquarters and in the structure of the force itself.

K.28.R - THE CO-OPERATION AND INTERACTION OF AIR MOBILE FORCES

THE CO-OPERATION AND INTERACTION OF AIR MOBILE FORCES WITH UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES (UAV). WHAT ARE THE OPPORTUNITIES, LIMITATIONS AND UNDER WHAT CIRCUMSTANCES CAN AN AIRMOBILE FORCE TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS TECHNOLOGY

The Report describes the characteristics of UAVs, their strengths and limitations and the overall benefits of using UAVs with Airmobility. It draws conclusions and makes recommendations for Finabel interoperability and future studies

F.29.R - THE ROLE OF ARTILLERY IN JOINT FIRES CO-ORDINATION

The operational context in which our Armed Forces will have to operate has changed considerably. A joint and combined approach has to be achieved resulting in a more effective engagement by our Armed Forces.

Comprehensive interoperability across the Defence Lines of Development are essential to create synergy by joint fires. Joint fire support co-ordination is one of the key elements in that process. Co-ordination cells at all levels with new dynamic fire support co-ordination procedures must be integrated into our Armed Forces.

The artillery staff have experience of co-ordinating organic fires and are capable of assuming more responsibilities in the future.

It is recommended that the artillery takes the lead in the co-ordination of joint fires and joint effects.

F.30.R - OPTIMISING THE METHODS OF AIRSPACE MANAGEMENT

OPTIMISING THE METHODS OF AIRSPACE MANAGEMENT (ASM) FOR THE LAND COMPONENT COMMANDER (LCC)

The aim of this publication is to assess how current procedures could be amended to allow more flexible use of the airspace above the Land Component in order that the effectiveness of airspace users (e.g. Ground Based Air Defence (GBAD), Artillery, manned/unmanned aerial vehicles) can be maximised, while minimising the risk to friendly forces.

K.27.R - THE USE OF AN AIRMOBILE FORCE AS PART OF AN INITIAL ENTRY CAPABILITY OF A HIGH READINESS FO

THE USE OF AN AIRMOBILE FORCE AS PART OF AN INITIAL ENTRY CAPABILITY OF A HIGH READINESS FORCE (HRF). WHAT ARE THE OPPORTUNITIES, LIMITATIONS AND UNDER WHAT CONDITIONS CAN AN AIRMOBILE FORCE BE EXPLOITED AS SUCH ?

This study provides the fundamental principles concerning the roles of Airmobile Forces as initial entry elements of a HRF command and control.

It presents guidance for the FINABEL Countries to develop this kind of forces, and provides selected techniques, procedures and limitations of an Airmobile Force to the employment or in conducting operational activity in reference to the different environmental situation. Furthermore, this study wants to clarify the different levels of command when assigned to an Airmobile Force Commander, the chain of Command and Control, planning, execution and support. Furthermore, the aim is to identify the opportunities, limitations and conditions under which an Airmobile Force could be used as a component of an Initial Entry Force (IEF) and, above all, to make up for the lack of reference documents on the subject 

A.22.R - VARIOUS ASPECTS OF LAND FORCES DOCTRINE IN PARTICULAR WITH REGARD TO ASYMMETRIC THREATS

This paper suggests how doctrine might change over the next 10 years. Little of what is foreseeable is likely to bring about major changes to high-level doctrine. Areas highlighted as being novel in our new doctrine publications will probably be a source of operational or training lessons, which should be exploited. They might result in changes to practices and procedures.
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